Meditations of Marcus Aurelius



Meditations of
Marcus Aurelius

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Introduction
Biography

Book I Read Discuss
Book II Read Discuss
Book III Read Discuss
Book IV Read Discuss
Book V Read Discuss
Book VI Read Discuss
Book VII Read Discuss
Book VIII Read Discuss
Book IX Read Discuss
Book X Read Discuss
Book XI Read Discuss
Book XII Read Discuss

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Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Book VII

What is badness?  It is that which thou hast often seen.  And on the occasion of everything which happens keep this in mind, that it is that which thou hast often seen.  Everywhere up and down thou wilt find the same things, with which the old histories are filled, those of the middle ages and those of our own day; with which cities and houses are filled now.  There is nothing new: all things are both familiar and short-lived.

Book VII - 2

How can our principles become dead, unless the impressions (thoughts) which correspond to them are extinguished?  But it is in thy power continuously to fan these thoughts into a flame.  I can have that opinion about anything, which I ought to have.  If I can, why am I disturbed?  The things which are external to my mind have no relation at all to my mind. -- Let this be the state of thy affects, and thou standest erect.  To recover thy life is in thy power.  Look at things again as thou didst use to look at them; for in this consists the recovery of thy life.

Book VII - 3

The idle business of show, plays on the stage, flocks of sheep, herds, exercises with spears, a bone cast to little dogs, a bit of bread into fish-ponds, labourings of ants and burden-carrying, runnings about of frightened little mice, puppets pulled by strings -- all alike.  It is thy duty then in the midst of such things to show good humour and not a proud air; to understand however that every man is worth just so much as the things are worth about which he busies himself.

Book VII - 4

In discourse thou must attend to what is said, and in every movement thou must observe what is doing.  And in the one thou shouldst see immediately to what end it refers, but in the other watch carefully what is the thing signified.

Book VII - 5

Is my understanding sufficient for this or not?  If it is sufficient, I use it for the work as an instrument given by the universal nature.  But if it is not sufficient, then either I retire from the work and give way to him who is able to do it better, unless there be some reason why I ought not to do so; or I do it as well as I can, taking to help me the man who with the aid of my ruling principle can do what is now fit and useful for the general good.  For whatsoever either by myself or with another I can do, ought to be directed to this only, to that which is useful and well suited to society.

Book VII - 6

How many after being celebrated by fame have been given up to oblivion; and how many who have celebrated the fame of others have long been dead.

Book VII - 7

Be not ashamed to be helped; for it is thy business to do thy duty like a soldier in the assault on a town.  How then, if being lame thou canst not mount up on the battlements alone, but with the help of another it is possible?

Book VII - 8

Let not future things disturb thee, for thou wilt come to them, if it shall be necessary, having with thee the same reason which now thou usest for present things.

Book VII - 9

All things are implicated with one another, and the bond is holy; and there is hardly anything unconnected with any other thing.  For things have been co-ordinated, and they combine to form the same universe (order).  For there is one universe made up of all things, and one God who pervades all things, and one substance, and one law, one common reason in all intelligent animals, and one truth; if indeed there is also one perfection for all animals which are of the same stock and participate in the same reason.

Book VII - 10

Everything material soon disappears in the substance of the whole; and everything formal (causal) is very soon taken back into the universal reason; and the memory of everything is very soon overwhelmed in time.

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