Meditations of Marcus Aurelius



Meditations of
Marcus Aurelius

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Introduction
Biography

Book I Read Discuss
Book II Read Discuss
Book III Read Discuss
Book IV Read Discuss
Book V Read Discuss
Book VI Read Discuss
Book VII Read Discuss
Book VIII Read Discuss
Book IX Read Discuss
Book X Read Discuss
Book XI Read Discuss
Book XII Read Discuss

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Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Book VIII

This reflection also tends to the removal of the desire of empty fame, that it is no longer in thy power to have lived the whole of thy life, or at least thy life from thy youth upwards, like a philosopher; but both to many others and to thyself it is plain that thou art far from philosophy.  Thou hast fallen into disorder then, so that it is no longer easy for thee to get the reputation of a philosopher; and thy plan of life also opposes it.  If then thou hast truly seen where the matter lies, throw away the thought, How thou shalt seem to others, and be content if thou shalt live the rest of thy life in such wise as thy nature wills.  Observe then what it wills, and let nothing else distract thee; for thou hast had experience of many wanderings without having found happiness anywhere, not in syllogisms, nor in wealth, nor in reputation, nor in enjoyment, nor anywhere.  Where is it then? I n doing what man's nature requires.  How then shall a man do this?  If he has principles from which come his affects and his acts.  What principles?  Those which relate to good and bad: the belief that there is nothing good for man, which does not make him just, temperate, manly, free; and that there is nothing bad, which does not do the contrary to what has been mentioned.

Book VIII - 2

On the occasion of every act ask thyself, How is this with respect to me?  Shall I repent of it?  A little time and I am dead, and all is gone.  What more do I seek, if what I am now doing is work of an intelligent living being, and a social being, and one who is under the same law with God?

Book VIII - 3

Alexander and Gaius [i.e. Julius Caesar] and Pompeius, what are they in comparison with Diogenes and Heraclitus and Socrates?  For they were acquainted with things, and their causes (forms), and their matter, and the ruling principles of these men were the same.  But as to the others, how many things had they to care for, and to how many things were they slaves?

Book VIII - 4

Consider that men will do the same things nevertheless, even though thou shouldst burst.

Book VIII - 5

This is the chief thing: Be not perturbed, for all things are according to the nature of the universal; and in a little time thou wilt be nobody and nowhere, like Hadrian and Augustus.  In the next place having fixed thy eyes steadily on thy business look at it, and at the same time remembering that it is thy duty to be a good man, and what man's nature demands, do that without turning aside; and speak as it seems to thee most just, only let it be with a good disposition and with modesty and without hypocrisy.

Book VIII - 6

The nature of the universal has this work to do, to remove to that place the things which are in this, to change them, to take them away hence, and to carry them there.  All things are change, yet we need not fear anything new.  All things are familiar to us; but the distribution of them still remains the same.

Book VIII - 7

Every nature is contented with itself when it goes on its way well; and a rational nature goes on its way well, when in its thoughts it assents to nothing false or uncertain, and when it directs its movements to social acts only, and when it confines its desires and aversions to the things which are in its power, and when it is satisfied with everything that is assigned to it by the common nature.  For of this common nature every particular nature is a part, as the nature of the leaf is a part of the nature of the plant; except that in the plant the nature of the leaf is part of a nature which has not perception or reason, and is subject to be impeded; but the nature of man is part of a nature which is not subject to impediments, and is intelligent and just, since it gives to everything in equal portions and according to its worth, times, substance, cause (form), activity, and incident.  But examine, not to discover that any one thing compared with any other single thing is equal in all respects, but by taking all the parts together of one thing and comparing them with all the parts together of another.

Book VIII - 8

Thou hast not leisure or ability to read.  But thou hast leisure or ability to check arrogance: thou hast leisure to be superior to pleasure and pain: thou hast leisure to be superior to love of fame, and not to be vexed at stupid and ungrateful people, nay even to care for them.

Book VIII - 9

Let no man any longer hear thee finding fault with the court life or with thy own.

Book VIII - 10

Repentance is a kind of self-reproof for having neglected something useful; but that which is good must be something useful, and the perfect good man should look after it.  But no such man would ever repent of having refused any sensual pleasure.  Pleasure then is neither good nor useful.

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