Meditations of Marcus Aurelius



Meditations of
Marcus Aurelius

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Introduction
Biography

Book I Read Discuss
Book II Read Discuss
Book III Read Discuss
Book IV Read Discuss
Book V Read Discuss
Book VI Read Discuss
Book VII Read Discuss
Book VIII Read Discuss
Book IX Read Discuss
Book X Read Discuss
Book XI Read Discuss
Book XII Read Discuss

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Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Book XI

These are the properties of the rational soul: it sees itself, analyses itself, and makes itself such as it chooses; the fruit which it bears itself enjoys -- for the fruits of plants and that in animals which corresponds to fruits others enjoy -- it obtains its own end, wherever the limit of life may be fixed.  Not as in a dance and in a play and in such like things, where the whole action is incomplete, if anything cuts it short; but in every part and wherever it may be stopped, it makes what has been set before it full and complete, so that it can say, I have what is my own.  And further it traverses the whole universe, and the surrounding vacuum, and surveys its form, and it extends itself into the infinity of time, and embraces and comprehends the periodical renovation of all things, and it comprehends that those who come after us will see nothing new, nor have those before us seen anything more, but in a manner he who is forty years old, if he has any understanding at all, has seen by virtue of the uniformity that prevails all things which have been and all that will be.  This too is a property of the rational soul, love of one's neighbour, and truth and modesty, and to value nothing more more than itself, which is also the property of Law.  Thus then right reason differs not at all from the reason of justice.

Book XI - 2

Thou wilt set little value on pleasing song and dancing and the pancratium, if thou wilt distribute the melody of the voice into its several sounds, and ask thyself as to each, if thou art mastered by this; for thou wilt be prevented by shame from confessing it: and in the matter of dancing, if at each movement and attitude thou wilt do the same; and the like also in the matter of the pancratium.  In all things, then, except virtue and the acts of virtue, remember to apply thyself to their several parts, and by this division to come to value them little: and apply this rule also to thy whole life.

Book XI - 3

What a soul that is which is ready, if at any moment it must be separated from the body, and ready either to be extinguished or dispersed or continue to exist; but so that this readiness comes from a man's own judgement, not from mere obstinacy, as with the Christians, but considerately and with dignity and in a way to persuade another, without tragic show.

Book XI - 4

Have I done something for the general interest?  Well then I have had my reward.  Let this always be present to thy mind, and never stop doing such good.

Book XI - 5

What is thy art?  To be good.  And how is this accomplished well except by general principles, some about the nature of the universe, and others about the proper constitution of man?

Book XI - 6

At first tragedies were brought on the stage as means of reminding men of the things which happen to them, and that it is according to nature for things to happen so, and that, if you are delighted with what is shown on the stage, you should not be troubled with that which takes place on the larger stage.  For you see that these things must be accomplished thus, and that even they bear them who cry out "O Cithaeron."  [Sophocles, Oedipus the King, 1391.]  And, indeed, some things are said well by the dramatic writers, of which kind is the following especially: --

Me and my children if the gods neglect,
This has its reason too.
[Euripides]

And again --
We must not chale and fret at that which happens.
And --
Life's harvest reap like the wheat's fruitful ear.
And other things of the same kind.

After tragedy the old comedy was introduced, which had a magisterial freedom of speech, and by its very plainness of speaking was useful in reminding men to beware of insolence; and for this purpose too Diogenes used to take from these writers.

But as to the middle comedy which came next, observe what it was, and again, for what object the new comedy was introduced, which gradually sunk down into a mere mimic artifice.  That some good things are said even by these writers, everybody knows: but the whole plan of such poetry and dramaturgy, to what end does it look!

Book XI - 7

How plain does it appear that there is not another condition of life so well suited for philosophising as this in which thou now happenest to be.

Book XI - 8

A branch cut off from the adjacent branch must of necessity be cut off from the whole tree also.  So too a man when he is separated from another man has fallen off from the whole social community.  Now as to a branch, another cuts it off, but a man by his own act separates himself from his neighbour when he hates him and turns away from him, and he does not know that he has at the same time cut himself off from the whole social system.  Yet he has this privilege certainly from Zeus who framed society, for it is in our power to grow again to that which is near to us, and be to come a part which helps to make up the whole. However, if it often happens, this kind of separation, it makes it difficult for that which detaches itself to be brought to unity and to be restored to its former condition.  Finally, the branch, which from the first grew together with the tree, and has continued to have one life with it, is not like that which after being cut off is then ingrafted, for this is something like what the gardeners mean when they say that it grows with the rest of the tree, but that it has not the same mind with it.

Book XI - 9

As those who try to stand in thy way when thou art proceeding according to right reason, will not be able to turn thee aside from thy proper action, so neither let them drive thee from thy benevolent feelings towards them, but be on thy guard equally in both matters, not only in the matter of steady judgement and action, but also in the matter of gentleness towards those who try to hinder or otherwise trouble thee.  For this also is a weakness, to be vexed at them, as well as to be diverted from thy course of action and to give way through fear; for both are equally deserters from their post, the man who does it through fear, and the man who is alienated from him who is by nature a kinsman and a friend.

Book XI - 10

There is no nature which is inferior to art, for the arts imitate the nature of things.  But if this is so, that nature which is the most perfect and the most comprehensive of all natures, cannot fall short of the skill of art.  Now all arts do the inferior things for the sake of the superior; therefore the universal nature does so too.  And, indeed, hence is the origin of justice, and in justice the other virtues have their foundation: for justice will not be observed, if we either care for middle things (things indifferent), or are easily deceived and careless and changeable.

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