Meditations of Marcus Aurelius



Meditations of
Marcus Aurelius

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Introduction
Biography

Book I Read Discuss
Book II Read Discuss
Book III Read Discuss
Book IV Read Discuss
Book V Read Discuss
Book VI Read Discuss
Book VII Read Discuss
Book VIII Read Discuss
Book IX Read Discuss
Book X Read Discuss
Book XI Read Discuss
Book XII Read Discuss

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Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Book XII

All those things at which thou wishest to arrive by a circuitous road, thou canst have now, if thou dost not refuse them to thyself.  And this means, if thou wilt take no notice of all the past, and trust the future to providence, and direct the present only conformably to piety and justice.  Conformably to piety, that thou mayest be content with the lot which is assigned to thee, for nature designed it for thee and thee for it.  Conformably to justice, that thou mayest always speak the truth freely and without disguise, and do the things which are agreeable to law and according to the worth of each.  And let neither another man's wickedness hinder thee, nor opinion nor voice, nor yet the sensations of the poor flesh which has grown about thee; for the passive part will look to this.  If then, whatever the time may be when thou shalt be near to thy departure, neglecting everything else thou shalt respect only thy ruling faculty and the divinity within thee, and if thou shalt be afraid not because thou must some time cease to live, but if thou shalt fear never to have begun to live according to nature -- then thou wilt be a man worthy of the universe which has produced thee, and thou wilt cease to be a stranger in thy native land, and to wonder at things which happen daily as if they were something unexpected, and to be dependent on this or that.

Book XII - 2

God sees the minds (ruling principles) of all men bared of the material vesture and rind and impurities.  For with his intellectual part alone he touches the intelligence only which has flowed and been derived from himself into these bodies.  And if thou also usest thyself to do this, thou wilt rid thyself of thy much trouble.  For he who regards not the poor flesh which envelops him, surely will not trouble himself by looking after raiment and dwelling and fame and such like externals and show.

Book XII - 3

The things are three of which thou art composed, a little body, a little breath (life), intelligence.  Of these the first two are thine, so far as it is thy duty to take care of them; but the third alone is properly thine.  Therefore if thou shalt separate from thyself, that is, from thy understanding, whatever others do or say, and whatever thou hast done or said thyself, and whatever future things trouble thee because they may happen, and whatever in the body which envelops thee or in the breath (life), which is by nature associated with the body, is attached to thee independent of thy will, and whatever the external circumfluent vortex whirls round, so that the intellectual power exempt from the things of fate can live pure and free by itself, doing what is just and accepting what happens and saying the truth: if thou wilt separate, I say, from this ruling faculty the things which are attached to it by the impressions of sense, and the things of time to come and of time that is past, and wilt make thyself like Empedocles' sphere,

All round, and in its joyous rest reposing;

and if thou shalt strive to live only what is really thy life, that is, the present -- then thou wilt be able to pass that portion of life which remains for thee up to the time of thy death, free from perturbations, nobly, and obedient to thy own daemon (to the god that is within thee).

Book XII - 4

I have often wondered how it is that every man loves himself more than all the rest of men, but yet sets less value on his own opinion of himself than on the opinion of others.  If then a god or a wise teacher should present himself to a man and bid him to think of nothing and to design nothing which he would not express as soon as he conceived it, he could not endure it even for a single day.  So much more respect have we to what our neighbours shall think of us than to what we shall think of ourselves.

Book XII - 5

How can it be that the gods after having arranged all things well and benevolently for mankind, have overlooked this alone, that some men and very good men, and men who, as we may say, have had most communion with the divinity, and through pious acts and religious observances have been most intimate with the divinity, when they have once died should never exist again, but should be completely extinguished?

But if this is so, be assured that if it ought to have been otherwise, the gods would have done it.  For if it were just, it would also be possible; and if it were according to nature, nature would have had it so.  But because it is not so, if in fact it is not so, be thou convinced that it ought not to have been so: -- for thou seest even of thyself that in this inquiry thou art disputing with the diety; and we should not thus dispute with the gods, unless they were most excellent and most just; -- but if this is so, they would not have allowed anything in the ordering of the universe to be neglected unjustly and irrationally.

Book XII - 6

Practise thyself even in the things which thou despairest of accomplishing.  For even the left hand, which is ineffectual for all other things for want of practice, holds the bridle more vigorously than the right hand; for it has been practised in this.

Book XII - 7

Consider in what condition both in body and soul a man should be when he is overtaken by death; and consider the shortness of life, the boundless abyss of time past and future, the feebleness of all matter.

Book XII - 8

Contemplate the formative principles (forms) of things bare of their coverings; the purposes of actions; consider what pain is, what pleasure is, and death, and fame; who is to himself the cause of his uneasiness; how no man is hindered by another; that everything is opinion.

Book XII - 9

In the application of thy principles thou must be like the pancratiast, not like the gladiator; for the gladiator lets fall the sword which he uses and is killed; but the other always has his hand, and needs to do nothing else than use it.

Book XII - 10

See what things are in themselves, dividing them into matter, form and purpose.

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